Tuesday, December 28, 2010

Wisconsin DNR announces new website

You are invited to explore the Wisconsin DNR's new website! The old site will remain available until mid-2010.

Organized by topic, the new website is much easier to navigate. "Lakes" appears within several spots, most notably:

1.) Environment & Health -> Natural Resources -> Lakes

http://new.dnr.wi.gov/Default.aspx?Page=391c2658-429f-4eab-af05-128368702c28

2.) Outdoors and Nature -> Public Lands in Wisconsin -> Lakes & Flowages

http://new.dnr.wi.gov/Default.aspx?Page=627fd10d-e329-4647-8093-9d00418b6d29

 A few notes about the new site:

Some pages link back to the old site. Over the coming months, Jim, Dennis and Jennifer will finish moving those pages over to the new site.

We will set up "redirects" from our old web addresses, so your links should still work. If you notice a problem, let us know. 

New Dynamic Web Pages - Some new "dynamic" web pages are available!http://new.dnr.wi.gov/Default.aspx?Page=391c2658-429f-4eab-af05-128368702c28

1.) The "Lake Pages" - Find a lake. Work in progress, with data updates and additional information (water quality, etc.) forthcoming.

2.) "Contacts" - instead of being maintained by hand, the contact information is coming out of SWIMS, enabling us to cross-link people and lake organizations to projects, etc. Recent updates will be reflected soon.

3.) "Lake Contour Maps" - The maps Jim has worked so hard to scan. Now, lake name, area, etc. table is coming from the DNR Register of Waterbodies to keep information consistent across our pages.

4.) "Local Projects" (via. Grants)-- Click Grants to browse grants awarded. Work in progress with recently awarded grants yet to be geo-located, more "activities" to be added, and more final reports yet to be uploaded.

5.) "Invasives"and "Clean Boats, Clean Waters" -- these pages are the same for the most part.

Source: 
Jim Vennie and Jennifer Filbert, Lakes-L Blog for Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. 101 S. Webster Street • PO Box 7921 •Madison, Wisconsin 53707-7921 • 608-266-2621

Asian Clams in Lake George

Lake George Mirror article on Asian clams in Lake George, NY  December 3rd, 2010

http://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2010/12/lake-george-invasives-fight-cost.html

 

2011 National Beach Conference

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will host the 2011 National Beach Conference March 15-17, in Miami, Florida.This conference will provide a forum for discussing national beach water quality issues, exchanging information, and coordinating efforts in research and decision-making. Prior to the start of the conference,on March 14, EPA and its partners will provide training on beach monitoring, rapid methods, and predictive tools. 

Source: EPA WaterHeadlines 

EPA Completes Research to Inform Development of New Recreational Water Quality Criteria

EPA has completed studies that serve as a scientific foundation for developing new or revised water quality criteria for recreational waters, such as lakes, rivers and oceans, by October 2012. EPA's research studies were focused on predictive modeling, method development and validation, and epidemiological studies. The new or revised criteria will replace the current criteria recommendations EPA issued in 1986 and are to be used by states, tribes and territories in their adoption of new water quality standards. These standards are to protect people who engage in recreational water activities from potential illness associated with fecal contamination in the water. The completion notices and reports from the studies are available on EPA's website at http://water.epa.gov/scitech/swguidance/waterquality/standards/criteria/health/recreation/index.cfm. Some of the studies have also been published in professional journals and others are in the process of being submitted for publication.

For more information contact Lisa Christ at christ.lisa@epa.gov

Source: WaterHeadlines

Thursday, December 02, 2010

LCBP announces aquatic invasive species grant recipients

Congratulations to the NY recipients of aquatic invasive species grants from the Lake Champlain Basin Program. Your great work and commitment to stewardship through innovative projects leveraged $233,704 to help protect aquatic resources from invasives, way to go!

• Ausable River Association - river steward
• Boquet River Association - wetland monitoring
• Darrin Freshwater Institute - Asian clam response
• Lake Champlain Maritime Museum - Asian clam response
• Lake Colby Association - Eurasian milfoil control
• Lake George Association - lake steward program
• Rainbow Lake Association - lake steward
• Research Foundation of SUNY - AIS prevention at fishing tournaments
• The FUND for Lake George - Asian clam response
• Upper Saranac Lake Foundation - Eurasian milfoil control and prevention
• Watershed Stewardship Program, Paul Smiths College - spread prevention and early detection
• Lewis Creek Association (VT) - European frogbit spread prevention and control

Source: Hilary Smith, APIP

Sunday, November 14, 2010

Invasive Species Ordinance

Here is a sign posted at the boat launch on Upper Saranac Lake, Santa Clara, NY. The town has long been progressive about protecting it's aquatic resources.

Wednesday, October 06, 2010

Water cycle seems out of whack, experts find

6:44 p.m. ET, Mon., October 4, 2010

NASA/JPL

Researchers who set out to create a baseline for future research on water cycle trends on Monday reported an alarming discovery: 18 percent more water was fed into the oceans from rivers and melting polar ice sheets in 2006 than in 1994.

"That might not sound like much — 1.5 percent a year — but after a few decades, it's huge," researcher Jay Famiglietti said in a statement released with the report in the peer-reviewed Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"In general, more water is good," said Famiglietti, an earth system professor at the University of California-Irvine. "But here's the problem: Not everybody is getting more rainfall, and those who are may not need it.

"What we're seeing is exactly what the (U.N.) Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change predicted, that precipitation is increasing in the tropics and the Arctic Circle with heavier, more punishing storms," he added. "Meanwhile, hundreds of millions of people live in semi-arid regions, and those are drying up."

The experts suspect that the evaporation and precipitation cycle of water is accelerating dangerously because of greenhouse gas-fueled higher temperatures. That, in turn, would trigger more severe monsoons and hurricanes.

"Hotter weather above the oceans causes freshwater to evaporate faster, which leads to thicker clouds unleashing more powerful storms over land," the statement said. "The rainfall then travels via rivers to the sea in ever-larger amounts, and the cycle begins again."

The researchers said they used satellite data on sea level rise, precipitation and evaporation to create what they called the "longest and first of its kind" record on global water discharge.

Over the 13 years studied, they added, "the trends were all the same: increased evaporation from the ocean that led to increased precipitation on land and more flow back into the ocean."

The experts cautioned, however, that 13 years is a relatively short time frame and that longer-term studies are under way.

Friday, August 27, 2010

LCBP releases $840,000 in Local Implementation Grants Opportunities

Implementation Grant programs covered in this announcement include: Pollution Prevention Grants (up to $25,000 per grant for technical projects), Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention Grants (up to

$25,000 per grant for technical projects),Organizational Support Grants (up to $3,000 per grant for organization building), andEducation and Outreach Grants (up to $7,500 per grant for educational

projects). The LCBP anticipates awarding more than 45 grants, summing to more than $840,000 in 2010 to support local community involvement toward the implementation of the comprehensive management

plan Opportunities for Action: An Evolving Plan for the Future of the Lake Champlain Basin. Grant funds are anticipated through agreements with the Great Lakes Fishery Commission and Environmental

Protection Agency with appropriations supported by U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy.

 

Grant Guidelines are available in the grants section of the LCBP website atwww.lcbp.org/grants.htm with more information about how the grant program works and to help you prepare a competitive

application. Application Forms are provided in both PDF and Microsoft Word formats, for your convenience. Please review all of the materials provided within the Grant Guidelines carefully before

beginning your application. Organizations with existing LCBP-funded projects are eligible to apply for new funding only if all project deliverables and obligations under the existing and past awards are fully

up-to-date and the projects are in good standing.

 

You are encouraged to contact us at the LCBP office for assistance as you begin to develop your project. Because they do not make award decisions, our staff can help you interpret the application instructions

and guidelines.

 

Please note that completed applications must be received at the LCBP office in Grand Isle by close of business on the date noted above. We hope to have award decisions by early December 2011.

 

If you would like to receive a printed or email version of this grant, or if you would prefer not to receive these notices from the LCBP, please contact us at 802-372-3213 or grants@lcbp.org.

I look forward to seeing the 2010 applications!

 

 

Kathy Jarvis

Lake Champlain Basin Program

54 West Shore Rd

Grand Isle, VT 05458

(802) 372-3213

Fax: (802) 372-3233

kjarvis@lcbp.org

 Lllll

Spiny Waterflea

The SUNY Plattsburgh / Lake Champlain Research Institute (LCRI) field crew caught spiny waterflea in Stewart's Bridge Reservoir on Tuesday 8/17.  This is the last ponded water downstream of Great Sacandaga Lake before the Sacandaga River's final run to the Hudson.  While this find is not surprising given the presence of SWF in Great Sacandaga, we believe it to be the first documented SWF in this waterbody.  (Perhaps others know of earlier documentation?)  Note the great photo of this specimen taken at the LCRI.

 

Sampling efforts thus far this summer have NOT detected spiny waterflea in the Glens Falls Feeder Canal or the Champlain Canal, so this is good news.

 

SUNY Plattsburgh / LCRI under the direction of Tim Mihuc, PhD is conducting field sampling activities associated with the Lake Champlain Long Term Water Quality and Biological Monitoring Project under an MOU with NYDEC using funding from the Lake Champlain Basin Program.  Sampling is being conducted at the outlet dam of Stewarts Bridge Reservoir, one site on the Feeder Canal, 2 sites on the Champlain Canal, and at the 15 long term stations on Lake Champlain.

 

Fred Dunlap

NY Lake Champlain Basin Program Coordinator
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Division of Water, Region 5
1115 Rte 86   PO Box 296
Ray Brook, NY  12977
ph: 518-897-1241     fax: 518-897-1245
email: fddunlap@gw.dec.state.ny.us

 

Thursday, August 26, 2010

Asian Clam Positively Identified in Lake George

Lake George, N.Y. - The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Darrin Fresh Water Institute (DFWI) has discovered a new invasive fresh water clam species in Lake George. This species, found last week by DFWI student Jeremy Farrell, was located in the Village of Lake George and poses a serious threat to native mussels and the Lake George ecosystem, according to Sandra Nierzwicki-Bauer, director of DFWI.

Nierzwicki-Bauer said the species - Corbicula fluminea - is an invasive clam from Asia, capable of self fertilization, achieving densities of thousands per square meter, and crowding native species from their typical habitats. Commonly known as the Asian clam, it is a light brown triangular clam that can survive in fresh and brackish waters. If the invasion is a localized one, it may be possible to eradicate, she added. The dominant native mussel in Lake George is Elliptio complanata. 

"It is imperative that we move quickly to determine the extent of this infestation to assess the best treatment options that can be undertaken immediately," said Nierzwicki-Bauer, who is also a professor of biology at Rensselaer. "We have reached out to the regulatory agencies to assess all our options."

The Lake George environmental organizations have contracted to bring in an expert in invertebrate biology and scientific SCUBA: Dan Marelli, from Florida. He has worked with DFWI scientists for over 15 years to help coordinate SCUBA surveys, and he will direct new surveys that will be carried out by FUND for Lake George, DFWI, Bateaux Below Inc., and volunteer divers. Immediate plans include a survey of the shallow and embayment areas to establish the extent of infestation. Possible eradication or management strategies include use of a benthic barrier, essentially a plastic mat that could "smother" the clams, suction harvesting, or a combination of these methods. Currently, benthic mats are being used on a one-acre area in Lake Tahoe, Calif., to help manage the infestation there. Preliminary field work by DFWI staff indicates that a minimum of 2.5 acres in Lake George is infested. 

The environmental groups will be coordinating with the Adirondack Park Agency and the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. 

An initial plan of action has been organized to complete a SCUBA survey during the next two weeks to determine the geographical range of the infestation. This will involve surveys by divers of the lake bottom sediment. Other nearby areas with suitable habitat will be surveyed soon. Initial surveys will be supervised by Marelli. Once the extent of the infestation has been quantified, either a management or eradication strategy will be determined. The initial survey work will utilize the eight-diver crew of Aquatic Invasives Management (AIM) of Lake Placid, which is currently working in Lake George on management of Eurasian watermilfoil, under a contract with the FUND for Lake George.

Peter Bauer, executive director of the FUND for Lake George, said, "This is the newest invader to be found in Lake George. We've long had Eurasian watermilfoil and curlyleaf pond weed, as well as zebra mussels. We've seen a few plants of Brittle Naiad, too. We don't know the current extent of the Asian clam infestation, but if we're lucky maybe this is an isolated infestation in Lake George that we caught early."

Once field investigations are completed, further information on the extent of the infestation will be provided.

"It is now most important that we pull together with other organizations and the public to mount a rapid and effective response to this disturbing discovery," said Bruce E. Young, chairman of the Lake George Park Commission. "The community should be reassured that steps are under way to assess the extent of the Asian clam colony and if possible, eradicate it."

"While the discovery of an established Asian clam population in the lake was not good news to hear, the good news is that all the groups involved are taking swift action and rallying the troops.  We are all divvying up the tasks, and LGA is heading up public outreach. It is very important to spread the word to area boaters and business owners, as we do not want the clam to spread further within our own lake or to other nearby bodies of water as well. We will be providing educational materials about the Asian clam and its spread to boaters, businesses, and residents all around the lake in the next few days," said Walt Lender, executive director, Lake George Association.

"It will take a concerted partnership effort to address Asian clam in Lake George. Key partners have already begun the rapid response process to survey, evaluate, and determine feasible control and spread prevention options. The Lake Champlain Basin Program will assist management efforts in any way possible as this species affects not only Lake George but the entire Lake Champlain Basin watershed and beyond," said Meg Modley, Aquatic Invasive Species management coordinator, Lake Champlain Basin Program.

Background on Corbicula fluminea

Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea) are native to South East Asia and were first documented on the west coast of the United States in 1938. Since then they have spread to over 40 states. Asian clams are small, averaging less than 25mm (1.5 inches) with an oval triangular shape, deep at the hinge. Its outer shell is yellow brown, light brown to black with distinctive elevated, evenly spaced concentric ridges on the surface. 

The Asian clam is a very hardy and persistent freshwater mollusk, capable of rapid growth and spread. The Asian clam prefers to colonize on sandy substrates in quiet, warmer, sunlit waters, and can be found with one-third of its shell protruding above the substrate (although it has been found at water depths to 250 feet and within the sediment buried up to 7 inches in Lake Tahoe).  Asian clams can form dense clusters, with up to 5,000 animals per square meter. Asian clams are able to withstand freezing conditions, but their ability to reproduce decreases with exposure to lower temperatures (below 10oC/50oF).  For a long time, New England was considered environmentally inhospitable to the Asian clam.

The Asian clam is hermaphroditic and therefore capable of self-fertilization. A single clam can release over 400 offspring per day, depending on the conditions. The microscopic pediveligers (the final veliger or larval stage) travel along the substrate to a new location, attaching with byssus fibers to any available suitable substrate. The young that are hatched in the spring usually attain maturity by the fall (at 6-10 mm) and live an average of two to four years, with a maximum life span of seven years.  

Geoffrey Schladow, director of the Tahoe Environmental Research Center of the University of California, Davis, said the Asian clams promote so much algae growth that they can turn some waters from blue to green. As they filter the water and consume plankton, they deposit high concentrations of nutrients in their excretions. Another significant impact of the Asian clams infestations is the "biofouling" or the impairment or degradation of intake pipes for power plants and drinking water treatment systems.

Contacts:

Mark Marchand
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
518-276-6098
marchm3@rpi.edu

Peter Bauer, executive director
Fund for Lake George
518.668.9700 x 304
Cell: 518.796.0112
pbauer@fundforlakegeorge.org 

Mike White, executive director
Lake George Park Commission
518.668.9347 x13
mike@lgpc.state.ny.us 

C. Walter Lender, executive director
Lake George Association
518.668.3558
wlender@lakegeorgeassociation.org

Asian Clam Positively Identified in Lake George

Lake George, N.Y. - The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Darrin Fresh Water Institute (DFWI) has discovered a new invasive fresh water clam species in Lake George. This species, found last week by DFWI student Jeremy Farrell, was located in the Village of Lake George and poses a serious threat to native mussels and the Lake George ecosystem, according to Sandra Nierzwicki-Bauer, director of DFWI.

Nierzwicki-Bauer said the species - Corbicula fluminea - is an invasive clam from Asia, capable of self fertilization, achieving densities of thousands per square meter, and crowding native species from their typical habitats. Commonly known as the Asian clam, it is a light brown triangular clam that can survive in fresh and brackish waters. If the invasion is a localized one, it may be possible to eradicate, she added. The dominant native mussel in Lake George is Elliptio complanata. 

"It is imperative that we move quickly to determine the extent of this infestation to assess the best treatment options that can be undertaken immediately," said Nierzwicki-Bauer, who is also a professor of biology at Rensselaer. "We have reached out to the regulatory agencies to assess all our options."

The Lake George environmental organizations have contracted to bring in an expert in invertebrate biology and scientific SCUBA: Dan Marelli, from Florida. He has worked with DFWI scientists for over 15 years to help coordinate SCUBA surveys, and he will direct new surveys that will be carried out by FUND for Lake George, DFWI, Bateaux Below Inc., and volunteer divers. Immediate plans include a survey of the shallow and embayment areas to establish the extent of infestation. Possible eradication or management strategies include use of a benthic barrier, essentially a plastic mat that could "smother" the clams, suction harvesting, or a combination of these methods. Currently, benthic mats are being used on a one-acre area in Lake Tahoe, Calif., to help manage the infestation there. Preliminary field work by DFWI staff indicates that a minimum of 2.5 acres in Lake George is infested. 

The environmental groups will be coordinating with the Adirondack Park Agency and the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. 

An initial plan of action has been organized to complete a SCUBA survey during the next two weeks to determine the geographical range of the infestation. This will involve surveys by divers of the lake bottom sediment. Other nearby areas with suitable habitat will be surveyed soon. Initial surveys will be supervised by Marelli. Once the extent of the infestation has been quantified, either a management or eradication strategy will be determined. The initial survey work will utilize the eight-diver crew of Aquatic Invasives Management (AIM) of Lake Placid, which is currently working in Lake George on management of Eurasian watermilfoil, under a contract with the FUND for Lake George.

Peter Bauer, executive director of the FUND for Lake George, said, "This is the newest invader to be found in Lake George. We've long had Eurasian watermilfoil and curlyleaf pond weed, as well as zebra mussels. We've seen a few plants of Brittle Naiad, too. We don't know the current extent of the Asian clam infestation, but if we're lucky maybe this is an isolated infestation in Lake George that we caught early."

Once field investigations are completed, further information on the extent of the infestation will be provided.

"It is now most important that we pull together with other organizations and the public to mount a rapid and effective response to this disturbing discovery," said Bruce E. Young, chairman of the Lake George Park Commission. "The community should be reassured that steps are under way to assess the extent of the Asian clam colony and if possible, eradicate it."

"While the discovery of an established Asian clam population in the lake was not good news to hear, the good news is that all the groups involved are taking swift action and rallying the troops.  We are all divvying up the tasks, and LGA is heading up public outreach. It is very important to spread the word to area boaters and business owners, as we do not want the clam to spread further within our own lake or to other nearby bodies of water as well. We will be providing educational materials about the Asian clam and its spread to boaters, businesses, and residents all around the lake in the next few days," said Walt Lender, executive director, Lake George Association.

"It will take a concerted partnership effort to address Asian clam in Lake George. Key partners have already begun the rapid response process to survey, evaluate, and determine feasible control and spread prevention options. The Lake Champlain Basin Program will assist management efforts in any way possible as this species affects not only Lake George but the entire Lake Champlain Basin watershed and beyond," said Meg Modley, Aquatic Invasive Species management coordinator, Lake Champlain Basin Program.

Background on Corbicula fluminea

Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea) are native to South East Asia and were first documented on the west coast of the United States in 1938. Since then they have spread to over 40 states. Asian clams are small, averaging less than 25mm (1.5 inches) with an oval triangular shape, deep at the hinge. Its outer shell is yellow brown, light brown to black with distinctive elevated, evenly spaced concentric ridges on the surface. 

The Asian clam is a very hardy and persistent freshwater mollusk, capable of rapid growth and spread. The Asian clam prefers to colonize on sandy substrates in quiet, warmer, sunlit waters, and can be found with one-third of its shell protruding above the substrate (although it has been found at water depths to 250 feet and within the sediment buried up to 7 inches in Lake Tahoe).  Asian clams can form dense clusters, with up to 5,000 animals per square meter. Asian clams are able to withstand freezing conditions, but their ability to reproduce decreases with exposure to lower temperatures (below 10oC/50oF).  For a long time, New England was considered environmentally inhospitable to the Asian clam.

The Asian clam is hermaphroditic and therefore capable of self-fertilization. A single clam can release over 400 offspring per day, depending on the conditions. The microscopic pediveligers (the final veliger or larval stage) travel along the substrate to a new location, attaching with byssus fibers to any available suitable substrate. The young that are hatched in the spring usually attain maturity by the fall (at 6-10 mm) and live an average of two to four years, with a maximum life span of seven years.  

Geoffrey Schladow, director of the Tahoe Environmental Research Center of the University of California, Davis, said the Asian clams promote so much algae growth that they can turn some waters from blue to green. As they filter the water and consume plankton, they deposit high concentrations of nutrients in their excretions. Another significant impact of the Asian clams infestations is the "biofouling" or the impairment or degradation of intake pipes for power plants and drinking water treatment systems.

Contacts:

Mark Marchand
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
518-276-6098
marchm3@rpi.edu

Peter Bauer, executive director
Fund for Lake George
518.668.9700 x 304
Cell: 518.796.0112
pbauer@fundforlakegeorge.org 

Mike White, executive director
Lake George Park Commission
518.668.9347 x13
mike@lgpc.state.ny.us 

C. Walter Lender, executive director
Lake George Association
518.668.3558
wlender@lakegeorgeassociation.org

France to Drain Glacial Lake That Threatens Thousands - Discovery News

http://news.discovery.com/earth/france-to-drain-glacial-lake-that-threatens-thousands.html

2075873984_b4bbd9c28a

French engineers are prepping to drain a dangerous lake hidden underneath a glacier on Mont Blanc before the lake breaches its icy confines and floods the Saint Gervais valley, home to 3,000 people.

Valley residents are well acquainted with the raw power of glacial outbursts from Mont Blanc. In 1892, a lake broke through its frozen container, surged into the valley and killed 175 people.

To prevent a repeat of this catastrophe, French authorities are responding quickly to the threat. Scientists first noted a cavity of water below the mountain-top glacier in March, but the magnitude of the lake was only discovered in July. 

Researchers believe the lake contains 2,275,000 cubic feet of water -- comparable to the amount of water released during the 1892 flood. If it bursts, it could inundate the valley in less than half an hour.

Melting of the overlying Tete-Rousse glacier, probably due to rising temperatures in the region, created this secret lethal lake. In other parts of the world, such as Iceland, glacial lakes often form due to volcanic activity.

In each case, the surrounding glacier acts as a temporary dam on the water. But it can easily crumble or, with enough water pressure, float up off the bedrock and release a torrent on the valley below. Icelanders are so used to these violent events that they've given them a name: "jokulhlaup."

As glaciers recede in many parts of the world, various monitoring programs have been set up to watch for potential jokulhlaups, including one in the Alps which spotted the Mount Blanc lake.

This is the first attempt to defuse a jokulhlaup, and pumping the water out of the massive lake is a complicated, risky project. "They have to drill between 40-50 meters (131-164 feet) of ice before reaching the water cavity. We are about 3,200 meters (roughly 10,500 feet) high; there's no road, only helicopter access and it's also an area prone to avalanches," Nicolas Karr, a member of France's National Forests Office told the BBC in an interview.

It is unclear how much of the lake engineers plan to drain. Even pumping out a small fraction of it will significantly reduce the stress on the overlying glacial cap, and the chance of a flood. Authorities are still not sure where the drained water will go. 

Image: girolame, Flickr


Thursday, August 12, 2010

Tour Operators, Israel Reject Claims That Jordan River Is Unsafe for Baptisms

Operators of tours to the Holy Land are defending their services, yet proceeding with caution, in response to reports that one of the holiest sites in Christendom may pose serious health concerns.

Israeli officials are reassuring Christian pilgrims that the Jordan River, where many Christians go to be baptized, poses no health risk, despite reports from environmentalists that the waters are dangerously polluted.

The environmentalist group Friends of the Earth contends that high levels of coliform bacteria from sewage in the river have made it unsafe for bathing. But water tests released this week prove otherwise, Eli Dror of Israel's Nature and Parks Authority told Reuters.

"There's absolutely no problem with the quality of the water. People can come and baptize here as much as they want, I guarantee it," Dror said.

Israeli officials strongly denied any problem and pointed out that they had received no health complaints.

Tour operators, meanwhile, said they were not alarmed by the report.

"This destination has increased in popularity in the last few years, and [the baptisms] are such a small component of our tour that people focus on a lot of other things," Lael Kassis of Go Ahead Tours said. 

"Israel has a religious history dating back thousands of years, so people will go for the incredible history and culture. And parts of the river are cleaner than others, so I don't hear any comments."

The Lower Jordan is a murky stream cut off from its source in the Sea of Galilee by the needs of towns and agribusiness and topped with waste water and runoff. But Israeli officials and tour providers say they work hard to provide a safe experience for people coming to be baptized in the river, and they say Friends of the Earth's claims should not scare visitors away.

"This site is one of the most important, most holy sites of the Christian people and they come from all over the world, so we're investing a lot of money to prepare it," Raphael Ben-Hur, an official with the Senior Ministry of Tourism, told Reuters. "It would be crazy to allow pilgrims to immerse themselves in pollution."

Jocelyn Pimm, managing director of Worldwide Christian Travel, agrees.

"People go just to be baptized in the River Jordan so the site is well-managed, specially designated for baptism with proper facilities, and I've never had complaints about pollution," Pimm said. "We have more people traveling to Israel now than we have ever had."

She said people will continue to go to the river regardless of the pollution reports, because there are so many historical and religious aspects to the pilgrimage.

"People will go just go to see the site without being baptized," Pimm said. "One person in about every 10 groups asks to be baptized. It's a very small number."

But Friends of the Earth insists the Jordan River is no place for a baptism.

"We've known for a long time that these waters are not healthy," Friends of the Earth's Gidon Bromberg told Reuters. "For most of the year they are four times more polluted than Israeli standards would permit.

"People who baptize in these waters presently, if they have a cut in their skin, could quickly develop a rash. If they swallow any of the water they could develop a stomach upset and start vomiting," he said.

Friends of the Earth alleged that competition for tourism may have persuaded Israeli authorities to bend health norms in the interest of keeping the industry booming there. But Dror said the group's health risk allegation was a scare campaign designed to promote its wider agenda -- to get Israel and Jordan to restore a third of the river's inflow from Galilee and return the river to better health.

"Of course it could be much better," Dror told Reuters. "But we need the water. We don't have any other choice."

Dror, referring to water quality assessment statistics, explained that the Lower Jordan contains large quantities of saline water from the upper Galilee, farm runoff, water from fish farms and partially treated sewage from a buried pipe -- but not "raw sewage" as charged by environmentalists.

Source: FoxNews.com

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Most Abundant Food Source Disappearing

In oceans around the world, there has been a surprisingly large and extensive decline in phytoplankton -- the tiny algae that keep marine food webs afloat.

The drifting green flecks have been dying off for at least a century, with a staggering 40 percent decline since 1950, according to a new study.

Phytoplankton make up half of all plant matter around the globe, said marine ecologist Daniel Boyce, whose study appears this week in the journal

Nature. Its disappearance threatens the stability of climate, the well-being of fisheries and the overall health of the oceans.

"It's hard to really imagine phytoplankton could be so important because most people don't see them in their daily lives. They're microscopic and they live out at sea," said Boyce, of Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada. "But everything that happens to them affects the entire marine food chain, including us."

Some recent satellite images have shown the ocean turning from green to blue as a result of phytoplankton declines, but those data stretch back only 13 years. Other studies have offered mixed results.

To get a more accurate picture and to look further into the past, Boyce and colleagues collected a half-million measurements of ocean clarity from a public data set that dated back to 1899.

Over the last century-plus, analyses showed, phytoplankton levels have dropped by one percent each year in eight out of 10 large ocean regions. The greatest decline occurred in areas around the poles, near the equator and in the open oceans. The rate of disappearance picked up after 1950, totaling a 40 percent drop-off since then.

"It's really big," said David Siegel, a marine scientist at the University of California, Santa Barbara. "I'm a little leery about how big that number is."

The scientists can't yet say what's causing the mass die-off of phytoplankton, but temperature data offer a clue. The declines were worst in places where the surface of the sea has warmed the most. Warmer ocean water limits the amount of nutrients that can get from the depths to the surface. Phytoplankton need those nutrients to live.

With less phytoplankton around, fish have less to eat. As the decline works its way up the food chain, fishermen will have less to catch and fish-eaters less to eat. Phytoplankton even affect climate by taking up carbon dioxide and absorbing heat.

"Everyone looks at blue oceans and goes: 'Isn't that beautiful?'" Siegel said. "But a blue ocean is full of nothing. You really want something, and we're only making more of the blue ocean."

Source: Discovery News
http://news.discovery.com/earth/phytoplankton-oceans-food-web.htmlOcean's

Thursday, July 08, 2010

Adirondack Forum Will Take Aim at Invasive Species

Registration is now open for a free Adirondack Forum on Invasive Species.  The Forum, a one-and-a-half day event, will be held August 10-11 at Paul Smith's College.  You will learn how you and your community can be prepared for harmful invasive species invading Adirondack lands and waters.

Partners of the Adirondack Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management have organized the Forum to give citizens, community groups, members of governmental and nongovernmental organizations, resource managers, and elected officials from across the region an opportunity to discuss invasive species. The Forum will highlight initiatives underway in the region; showcase local successes and challenges as told by community members; feature up-to-date information about new invasive species; and identify important next steps that groups must collectively take to have a real and lasting impact on this challenging environmental and economic issue. 

The Forum's theme centers on the need to consider all types of invasive species – plants and animals in both aquatic and terrestrial settings – and on ways in which communities can be prepared to address them. Invasive species are a top threat to lands and waters, to favorite outdoor pastimes and cherished traditions, and to forestry, fisheries, and agriculture upon which local economies rely. Some species, like purple loosestrife, have been in New York for hundreds of years, but others, like emerald ash borer, arrived only recently. The explosion in the expansion of species and the rate of new arrivals is alarming and cause for concern.

Each year a greater number of communities are faced with tough decisions about invasive species. In response, groups in the Adirondack region banded together over a decade ago to take aim at this pressing problem. They work together to halt the invasion by focusing on prevention and management. A great deal has been accomplished, but much more has yet to be done.

The Forum is free, and participants may register for all or part of the event. Information about registration, lodging and meals and a draft program are available online at http://adkinvasives.com/Forum.html. The deadline to register is July 28. For more information, contact Hilary Smith at the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program,

518-576-2082 or hsmith@tnc.org.

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Citizen science: Birders contribute valuable data on invasive plant species

ScienceDaily (2010-06-22) -- In an effort to assess ties between birds' feeding habits and the spread of nonnative invasive plants, researchers provided ornithologists from four US states with questionnaires on daily bird-plant encounters. The 1,143 unique interactions reported by the birders laid the groundwork for a study on the role of native birds in the seed dispersal of invasive plants throughout the US.

Clare Aslan and Marcel Rejmánek of the University of California, Davis mailed questionnaires to more than 1,000 members of the Ornithological Societies of North America in the states of California, Florida, New York and Washington. The questionnaires addressed daily birding activities, experience level of the birder, bird-plant interactions and any additional comments. The answers were analyzed by the researchers and compared with pre-existing empirical data and/or follow-up field observations.

From the 179 birders who responded, the researchers gathered 1,143 interactions -- of those interactions, 539 (47 percent) involved birds feeding on fruits or seeds of nonnative plants. As birds feed on seed-bearing fruit or the seeds of plants themselves, they inadvertently drop leftovers in nearby soil or carry them greater distances in their plumage. The birders' reports suggest that--through their feeding and habitat preferences--specific birds are contributing to the spread of certain nonnative invasive plant species.
"The spread of invasive plants is tricky to keep track of," said Aslan. "Even if scientists are able to pin-point the site of introduction, it's very difficult to untangle the method, frequency and route of dispersal. In the case of fruit-eating migratory birds, this can be even more challenging as the seed dispersal is more widespread. The goal is to link specific birds with their new-found preferences for certain invasive plant species."
For example, the common North American bird the Yellow-rumped Warbler (Dendroica coronata) was reported to feed on the invasive Chinese tallow, glossy privet and European olive plants in California; the researchers later confirmed all three accounts through field observations. The survey analyses also identified 17 under-researched plant species of particular concern for invasion as they were observed to be frequented by birds; these reports provided scientists with research ideas.
"By gathering the daily observations of established ornithologists, we were able to locate a starting point for future studies," said Rejmánek. "We identified birds feeding on and nesting in plants introduced to the U.S., and we identified new plants that hadn't been considered for follow-up research before. Incorporating the findings from birdwatchers, we are able to prioritize research efforts and fill in some of the current knowledge gaps on the topic."
Source: Science Daily
Click on Title link to view entire article.

Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Association of Watershed and Stormwater Professionals Launches new website

The Center for Watershed Protection has announced the launch of the Association of Watershed and Stormwater Professionals (AWSPs) organization and website. The new website  is of limited use, only providing information on membership benefits for this fledgling organization. These include:
  • Two issues of AWSP journal (due out Fall 2010 and Spring 2011) valued at $49/ issue
  • Substantial webcast discounts (up to $100 more than the Early Bird specials for the season or $20 per webcast).
  • You can save a total of $200 when you register for two sets of webcasts!
  • 50% discounts on publications
  • Subscription to our quarterly e-newsletter, Runoff Rundown


Click on Title link to view entire article.

Monday, April 26, 2010

EPA Requests Proposals for Urban Watershed Grant

As part of the Urban Waters initiative, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is making available up to $600,000 in a targeted watershed grant for an eligible entity to establish and manage a national-scale, competitive urban watershed small grant program, and provide urban watershed technical services. EPA's Urban Waters initiative will help communities – especially disadvantaged communities – access, restore and benefit from their waters and the surrounding land.

The urban watershed small grant program and the watershed technical services funded under the EPA grant will promote community stewardship by increasing the capacity of local watershed groups and local communities. Better understanding of their urban watersheds will lead to better decision making, and improved restoration and protection efforts in the future. EPA is encouraging local watershed organizations and communities to envision the role their urban watershed should have in their long range development plans.

Questions must be received by May 6, 2010 and proposals must be received by EPA by May 19, 2010. The selection of the successful applicant will be announced this summer.

More information on the Targeted Watershed Grants Program: http://www.epa.gov/twg

Thursday, April 08, 2010

EPA Decentralized Wastewater Management E-Handbook Now Available

The EPA Office of Wastewater Management has recently expanded its "Handbook for Managing Onsite and Clustered (Decentralized) Wastewater Treatment Systems with the addition of an "E-Handbook." The E-Handbook features resource guides containing detailed information on the 13 management program elements featured in the existing management handbook: public education, planning, performance, site evaluation, design, construction/installation, operation/maintenance, inspections/monitoring, residuals management, training/certification, financial assistance, inventory/recordkeeping, and compliance assurance.

The E-Handbook focuses on individual and clustered wastewater systems that discharge to the soil, but the information can also be applied to small systems that discharge to surface waters through federal or state National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit programs. The E-Handbook is intended for health departments, wastewater system management entities, local governments, and others involved in managing multiple individual or clustered treatment systems. Each resource guide contains detailed information on each program element topic and links to other resources, case studies, and examples of successful management programs. The resource guides in the E-Handbook can be accessed via hot-links in the current Management Handbook posted at http://www.epa.gov/owm/onsite

Wednesday, April 07, 2010

Upcoming Invasive Species Webinars

Cornell University Cooperative Extension ForestConnect Webinar Series April and May, 2010

Anyone who has not previously registered [you only need to register once] can complete the registration via the WEBINARS link at www.ForestConnect.info<http://www.ForestConnect.info> Registration is quick and without cost. Registration ensures you receive notice of the specific link to participate, first come first served, in each monthly webinar. Webinars are live at noon and 7PM and typically run 60 minutes plus questions.

More information about the ForestConnect webinar series is available at www.ForestConnect.info<http://www.ForestConnect.info> SAF CFE credits will be requested.

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April 21, 2010 - "Managing early successional wildlife habitat" will be presented by Kristi Sullivan, Cornell University Department of Natural Resources. Grasslands, shrublands, and young forest habitats (collectively referred to as early-successional habitats) have been declining in New York and throughout the Northeast for decades as have the wildlife species associated with them. Many are listed as species of special concern in several northeastern states. The American woodcock has declined considerably over the past 30 years, and New England cottontails occur in only 20% of the area in which it was historically found. During this webinar, woodland owners, foresters, and natural resource managers learn about tools to manage habitat for the benefit of early successional wildlife including ruffed grouse, songbirds, New England cottontails, and other wildlife.

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May 19, 2010 - "Effectively Communicating the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Message through Media Outreach" will be presented by Dr. Holly Menninger, Cornell University Department of Natural Resources. This webinar is especially relevant to Extension educators, natural resource professionals, and invasive species team leaders. The communication of clear, accurate, and consistent messages about Emerald Ash Borer is a critical component of an effective EAB outreach program. With an emphasis on EAB preparedness and community action, Menninger will provide Webinar participants with tips and tools to more effectively use media outreach to deliver these messages to the public. Topics covered will include: message development, an overview of journalism, strategies for media engagement, and tips for more successful interviews.

Peter J. Smallidge, Ph.D.
NYS Extension Forester
Director, Arnot Teaching and Research Forest
Director, Cornell Maple Program

116 Fernow Hall, Department of Natural Resources
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853

pjs23@cornell.edu
www.ForestConnect.info
www.ArnotForest.info
www.CornellMaple.info

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Thanks to Leslie Surprenant for bringing this to my attention

Leslie Surprenant
Invasive Species Management Coordinator
NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation
Office of Invasive Species Coordination
625 Broadway, 5th Floor
Albany, NY 12233-4756
518-402-8980

EPA Climate Reports Available Online

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Water has issued the National Water Program Climate Change Strategy 2009 Progress Report. The report summarizes the climate change accomplishments of the National Water Program through 2009. The report, along with highlights factsheets, is available at: http://www.epa.gov/ow/climatechange/implementation.html

EPA's Climate Ready Estuaries program recently issued its 2009 Progress Report, describing ongoing efforts to assist coastal communities in preparing for the impacts of climate change. This report features the activities of each of the program's 11 partners and key lessons learned in the adaptation-planning process.

The Progress Report can be downloaded at: http://www.epa.gov/cre/downloads/2009-CRE-Progress-Report.pdf

Sunday, April 04, 2010

NALMS 19th Annual Southeastern Lakes Management Conference: May 4 - 7, 2010

NALMS 19th Annual Southeastern Lakes Management Conference:

Managing Extremes: Watersheds and Climate Disruption

May 4 - 7, 2010   Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Hawthorne Inn and Conference Center.  C

onference and hotel registration deadlines are coming up soon.  Please note the changes in dates from previous announcements:

• Early Bird Conference registration deadline:  Sunday, April 4, 2010-         Hotel registration at discounted rate deadline:  Tuesday, April 13, 2010

The conference is focused on the continuing challenges of protecting, managing and maintaining water quality, water supply and aquatic resources under the full range of conditions including the extreme circumstances of weather and climate change. 

(Visit http://nclakemanagement.org/conferences/SE19/index.html to register for conference).

PRECONFERENCE WORKSHOPS:  May 4 & 5, 2010

Tuesday, May 4, 2010 – Full day workshops

• Algae Identification  - Instructors:  JoAnn Burkholder, PhD, NCSU and Linda Ehrlich, PhD, Phycologist

• "Man VS Stats", a survival guide for the statistical wilderness - Instructor: Dennis Helsel, PhD, Practical Stats

Wednesday, May 5, 2010 – ½ day morning workshops

• Life and Death for Lakes: Basic Properties and Processes, Dr. John Hains, Clemson

• Local Stream Restoration Tour, Darrell Westmoreland, North State Environmental

CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS

The Conference opening plenary session is at 1:30 PM on Wednesday, May 5 with a talk by Linda Rimer, US EPA on Climate Change.  Jason Ortegren will give a talk entitled

Perspectives on Drought in the Southeastern U.S.: Past, Present...and Future? as the highlighted speaker for the luncheon on Thursday, May 6.

Concurrent sessions from Wednesday afternoon through Friday noon will cover a multitude of subjects that reflect the broad range of issues affecting lakes and watersheds in the Southeast.  Topics in the sessions include – Drought and Flood management, Water Conservation, Water Quality, Storm Water Management, Stream and Watershed Restoration, Water Supply Issues, Climate Change Initiatives, Invasive Species and other important topics.

LOCATION: The Hawthorne Inn and Conference Center is conveniently located in central North Carolina.  Owned and operated by Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, the Inn is conveniently located in downtown Winston-Salem – at the doorstep of Old Salem.The conference rate is $77 for single, double, double /double or King plus taxes.  Complimentary breakfast is included with room. Reservations can be made by calling

800 972-3774 and ask for the NC Lake Management Conference block or online @ www.hawthorneinn.com code 26D4ES.

The reserved block of rooms at the conference rate will only be available until Friday, April 13, 2010- so reserve early at the discounted rate!

REGISTRATION:  $175 (after April 4: $200); includes morning coffee, two lunches, breaks, as well as a special reception on Wednesday night at the Hawthorne Inn.  There are additional registration fees for the Pre-Conference Workshops on May 4-5 (includes breaks and lunch for full day workshops).  Workshop and conference registration information and forms can be found on the NCLMS website at

http://nclakemanagement.org/conferences/SE19/index.html.

For exhibitor registration information, contact Cary Martin at cary.martin@aquacontrol.com.

Friday, April 02, 2010

COUNCIL PROPOSES ACTION TO PROTECT FORESTS, FARMLANDS AND WATERWAYS FROM INVASIVE SPECIES

Draft Report Recommends New Classification System to Restrict Movement of Non-Native Plants and Animals

For the first time, New York would classify non-native plants and animals to help prevent the spread of invasive species through waterways, forests and farmlands, under a proposal unveiled today by the state Invasive Species Council.

The Council released a draft report, "A Regulatory System for Non-Native Species," that calls for a multi-pronged approach to tackling one of the state's fastest growing environmental threats. Among other recommendations, the Council proposed a new assessment system for invasive species – such as zebra mussels, Sirex wood wasps and Eurasion milfoil – that would allow the state to categorize them as "prohibited," "regulated" or "unregulated." Such a classification system would help restrict movement of potentially harmful plants and animals.

The Council, created by state statute, comprises nine state agencies and is co-led by the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and the Department of Agriculture and Markets (DAM). The Council released the draft report for public comment through May 14 (details below). Following finalization, the report will be sent to Governor David A. Paterson and the state Legislature for possible action.

"Invasive species have a devastating impact, not only on the environment but also the economy," DEC Commissioner Pete Grannis said. "They have wiped out certain tree species, hurt recreational and commercial fishing, and tainted water supplies. The best way to prevent their spread is to focus on the many pathways by which plants and animals are moved around the globe. The system the Council is proposing strikes the right balance of minimizing the major threats to our ecology and economy while allowing for the careful use of plants and animals that pose lower risks."

The Public Review Draft of the "invasive species list report" - A Regulatory System for Non-native Species - has been released for public comment. Comments will be received through 14 May 2010.

You can find the Report at http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/63402.html

EPA Holds Additional Public Hearings on Proposed Florida Water Quality Standards

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is holding several public hearings in April, in addition to the public hearings that were held in February, to receive more input on the agency's proposed Florida water quality standards. The standards will protect people's health, aquatic life and the long-term recreational uses of Florida's waters, which are a critical part of the state's economy.

The additional hearings are scheduled for:

April 13, 2010: Fort Myers
Harborside Event Center
1375 Monroe Street, Fort Myers, Fla. 33901
12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

April 14, 2010: Tampa
Hilton Tampa Airport
2225 North Lois Avenue, Tampa, Fla. 33607
12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

April 15, 2010: Jacksonville
Clarion Hotel Airport Conference Center
2101 Dixie Clipper Drive, Jacksonville, Fla. 32218
1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.

EPA is accepting public comments on the proposed standards through April 28

More on the proposed rule and public hearings:
http://www.epa.gov/waterscience/standards/rules/florida/

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

EPA Proposes Veto of West Virginia Mine Permit Under the Clean Water Act

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced its proposal under the Clean Water Act to significantly restrict or prohibit mountain top mining at the Spruce No. 1 surface mine in Logan County, W. Va. Spruce No.1 mine is one of the largest mountaintop removal operations ever proposed in Central Appalachia. The project was permitted in 2007 and subsequently delayed by litigation. The Spruce No. 1 mine would bury over 7 miles of headwater streams, directly impact 2,278 acres of forestland and degrade water quality in streams adjacent to the mine.

EPA's proposed determination comes after extended discussions with the company failed to produce an agreement that would lead to a significant decrease of the environmental and health impacts of the Spruce No. 1 mine. EPA has used its Clean Water Act veto authority in just 12 circumstances since 1972 and never for a previously permitted project. The proposed determination identifies numerous potential adverse impacts associated with the Spruce No. 1 project including water quality impacts, fish and wildlife impacts, mitigation impacts, and cumulative mining impacts.

Clean Water Act (CWA) Section 404(c) authorizes EPA to restrict or prohibit placing certain pollutants in streams, lakes, rivers, wetlands and other waters if the agency determines that the activities would result in "unacceptable adverse impacts" to the environment, water quality, or water supplies. This authority applies to proposed projects as well as projects previously permitted under the CWA. A final decision to restrict or prohibit the Spruce No.1 mine will be made at EPA Headquarters based on a recommendation from the Regional Administrator, public comments, and discussions with the Army Corps of Engineers and the Mingo Logan Coal Company.

The proposed determination is being published in the federal register and EPA is taking public comment for 60 days. EPA is also scheduling a public hearing in West Virginia to provide an additional opportunity for public input.

The proposed determination: http://www.epa.gov/region03/mtntop/spruce1documents.html

Tuesday, March 30, 2010

EPA's Watershed Academy Webcast on Monitoring and Assessment Under the Clean Water Act

EPA is announcing a Watershed Academy Webcast on April 7, 2010 at 1:00 - 3:00 pm Eastern to learn about "Monitoring and Assessment Under the on the Clean Water Act." This is a third in a series of Webcasts on the Clean Water Act (CWA). Earlier Webcast topics included an introduction to the CWA and an introduction to water quality standards.

This Webcast will focus on key aspects of monitoring and assessment under the CWA including:
1) collection, assembly and evaluation of water quality data and other relevant information, 2) inferring current waterbody condition based on such data and information, and 3) determining whether or not individual waterbodies meet applicable state water quality criteria.

To register for this Webcast, visit www.epa.gov/watershedwebcasts

Tuesday, March 09, 2010

Virtual Water Trade Show

Introducing a new, completely virtual water event!

VirtualH2O, taking place April 20-21, 2010, will combine virtual tradeshow exhibits and conference presentations to deliver attendees an innovative -- and convenient -- opportunity to network with and learn from leaders in the water and wastewater industries.

Conference Program

VirtualH2O will offer attendees access to 30 presentations across the following tracks: Municipal Drinking Water, Municipal Wastewater, Industrial Water/Wastewater, Urban Water Management, and Municipal Water Utility Management. Click here (http://www.virtualh2oevent.com/index/conference-information.html) to view the conference agenda.

Conference sessions will be delivered as pre-recorded webcasts, with instructors on-hand for a live Q & A session after the presentation.

Registration is FREE and absolutely no travel is required.

Virtual Trade Show

Exhibitors will be on-hand in virtual booths to share information about their latest water and wastewater products and network with attendees. Visiting a virtual booth provides attendees with an innovative way to learn about and evaluate products that interest them -- without traveling to a physical tradeshow or walking an exhibit hall.

VirtualH2O takes networking efforts to the next level, enabling real-time interaction between vendors and attendees in the form of live chat and email exchanges. Exhibitors can also share information about their products and services through the use of video as well as literature downloads.

More information available at www.virtualh2oevent.com

Register at https://presentations.inxpo.com/Shows/Penwell/H2O/04-10/Registration/registration.html

Thursday, February 18, 2010

Winnipesaukee communities discuss solutions to water quality concerns

Winnipesaukee communities discuss solutions to water quality concerns
by Erin Plummer
January 13, 2010
MEREDITH — Communities and state officials are taking steps toward improving water quality on Lake Winnipesaukee with the release of unfavorable data on the condition of various areas of the lake.

Representatives from the Department of Environmental Services, North Country Resource, Conservation, and Development, the Lakes Region Planning Commission, the University of New Hampshire, representatives from Moultonboro, Laconia, Gilford, and Holderness, and other interested parties came out for a meeting in Meredith last Tuesday to address water quality on local subwatersheds.

Conservation officials discussed looking at a subwatershed approach to addressing water quality on Winnipesaukee, working on a smaller scale for a possible greater chance of success, as it would be more manageable. This approach could identify pollution sources and identify clear regulatory authority and greater coordination of efforts.

The presentation was part of a watershed planning an implementation process that started in 2006.
Click on Title link to view entire article. Thanks to Diane Rush for the submission.
Source: NewHampshireLakesAndMountains.com by Salmon Press,  PO Box 729, 5 Water Street, Meredith, NH 03253