Friday, May 27, 2016

NYDEC Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention Regs Now In Effect

NY’s new Aquatic Invasive Species Regulations – reasonable precautions for boaters prior to launch (Part 576) - take effect today. They are published in today’s State Register and the Environmental Notice Bulletin. They are on DEC’s website along with Q/A and related documents on this page: http://www.dec.ny.gov/regulations/2359.html#576
The entire regulation - Part 576 Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention - is explained at http://www.dec.ny.gov/regulations/104431.html

New York adopts regulations to protect its waterways from invasive species

GOVERNOR CUOMO ANNOUNCES ADOPTION OF REGULATIONS TO PROTECT NEW YORK'S WATERWAYS AND NATURAL HABITATS FROM INVASIVE SPECIES

Statewide Regulations Require Boaters to Take 'Reasonable Precaution' Against Spread of Aquatic Invasive Species through Recreational Boating

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced the adoption of new regulations that will help protect New York State's waters from the spread of aquatic invasive species and preserve local ecosystems. Signed into law by Governor Cuomo in September 2014, the regulations prohibit the launch of watercraft prior to taking 'reasonable precautions,' including the removal of visible plant or animal matter, proper material disposal in a receptacle or upland location, and treatment by operators launching watercraft or floating docks into public waters.

"We all share a responsibility to protect our environment, and these proactive measures are an important step forward as we work to keep our waters pristine and safeguard local ecosystems this boating season," Governor Cuomo said. "Preventing the spread of invasive species in New York's waterways will help ensure that our natural treasures remain major economic assets for years to come."

With over 7,600 freshwater lakes, ponds and reservoirs and 70,000 miles of rivers, brooks and streams, New York State is particularly vulnerable to the introduction of invasive species. Once established, aquatic invasive species, such as spiny waterflea and Eurasian water milfoil, can rapidly spread through connecting waterbodies or by "hitchhiking" on the vessels of recreational boaters and anglers. These regulations are an important step in Governor Cuomo's initiative to preserve New York's vast waterways from the danger aquatic invasive species can cause to the environment, human health and the economy of a region.

Thursday, May 26, 2016

HOW TO IMPROVE WATER QUALITY IN YOUR COMMUNITY: SIMPLE STEPS LEAD TO BIG LEAPS IN PROTECTING WATER QUALITY!

CLEAN WATER IS ESSENTIAL TO THE HEALTH OF COMMUNITIES EVERYWHERE! HERE ARE EIGHT THINGS YOU CAN DO TO PROTECT WATER RESOURCES IN YOUR COMMUNITY AND BEYOND:

  • Stop mowing near streams and ponds: Mowing near streams and ponds eliminates the natural protective buffer that tall grasses, shrubs and trees provide. Natural buffers protect against erosion, filter stormwater runoff, reduce harmful pollutant loads and provide habitat for mosquito-eating amphibians, fish, birds and beneficial insects.
  • Reduce lawn fertilizer usage: One of the best ways to support the health of local water resources is to reduce the use of pesticides and fertilizers. Not only are they costly, but, when over-applied or if applied right before a rainstorm, the chemicals runoff directly into our local waterways. Before applying, always remember to test your soil, read product labels and check the forecast. Also consider natural alternatives like composting!
  • Host a “Test Your Well” event: Well testing is a great way to promote groundwater protection, help people understand their role in safeguarding drinking water quality, and provide education around the proper disposal of oil, chemicals, pesticides and medicines. Learn how to host an event in your community!
  • Design and construct a rain garden: You’ve heard this one from us before, but, what can we say, we love rain gardens, and rightfully so! They’re cost effective, easy to build and do wonders in reducing erosion, promoting ground water recharge, minimizing flooding and removing pollutants from stormwater runoff. Read all about them!
  • Test and treat your ponds and lakes: Testing your pond/lake water is an important part of preventing problems like harmful weed and algae growth. Princeton Hydro professionals can provide a comprehensive analysis and an array of eco-friendly approaches to control nuisance species and promote the continual health of your pond/lake. Learn more!
  • Reduce erosion and exposed soil on your property: If you notice erosion occurring on your property, planting native plants can really help! Their roots stabilize the soil, reduce erosion and prevent sediment loading in your waterways, which has a huge impact on the water quality of downstream ponds, lakes and reservoirs!
  • Develop a stewardship plan for your community: Bring your community together to help preserve its natural resources. Princeton Hydro’s team of natural resource scientists can help you get the ball rolling by preparing stewardship plans focused on controlling invasive species and protecting the long-term health of open spaces, forests habitats, wetlands and water-quality in your community.

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Source: Princeton Hydro blog

 

The Center for Watershed Protection releases new guide for Safe Waters, Healthy Waters

Safe Waters, Healthy Waters: A Guide for Citizen Groups on Bacteria Monitoring in Local Waterways

The Center for Watershed Protection, Inc. (the Center) has released a new guide for citizen science groups and watershed organizations across the nation to take a role in finding and eliminating sources of harmful bacteria in their communities. Bacteria is one of the most common pollutants in our nation's waterways. Researchers and regulatory agencies have determined that monitoring bacteria in waterways can help identify human health risks associated with drinking water, shellfish consumption, and recreational water contact.

You can read and download the guide here: http://www.cwp.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/SAFE-WATERS-Guide_Final.pdf

For more information about the Safe Waters, Healthy Waters guide, contact Laurel Williamson, Stormwater and Watershed Planner, Center for Watershed Protection, at lw@cwp.org. For General Questions, call 410-461-8323, or email center@cwp.org

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Source: Center for Watershed Protection